Pro Audio

Carvin had offered a smattering of pro audio gear in their earlier years, but they didn't really have a complete pro audio department until the late 1970's.  Although there wasn't a huge selection of gear, there was enough to accommodate just about any playing situation on any budget.

Click each picture for a larger version.

 

1979 Basses

1979 Guitars

1979 Bass Amps

1979 Guitar Amps

1979 Carvin Catalog Cover

The Q1608 Mixer was Carvin's top-of-the-line mixer in 1979.  This 16-channel board had a wide range of features, including balanced differential inputs, 3-band parametric channel EQ, joystick quad panning, channel and main interrupt points, 8 balanced output and pink noise generator.  It is shown above with the MX-16 expander, which added an additional 16 channels for a combined total of 32 channels.  The Q1608 sold for $2950, and the MX-16 was $1950.  Anvil flight cases were required for these items; the Anvil #A10 (for the Q1608) was $225, and the Anvil #A5 (for the expander) was $200.  For full specifications, click here.

On the left is the channel control layout for the Q1608.  Controls (from top to bottom) are attenuation (red), 3-band parametric EQ (silver), cue level (yellow), effects buss 1 (green), effects buss 2 (blue), and pan (silver).  Below that are 4 channel-assign switches, and volume fader.

On the right is the master controls for the 16-channel mixer. 

 

In addition to the studio-style Q1608, Carvin also offered smaller mixers for personal studio and live sound use.  On the left is the S1800, which was an 18 channel stereo mixer.  In addition to it's 18 channels, it had two 10-band graphic equalizers, 3 VU meters, Hammond reverb, teak front panel and self-contained case.  The S1800 sold for $1295.

The S1200 (left) was the same as the S1800, in a 12-channel package.  With the exception of the number of channels, the features and functionality was the same as it's larger counterpart.  Direct price on this model was $950.

These are the controls for the S1800, S1200 and SP600 mixers.  On the left, the channel controls, which included attenuation (red), 2-band parametric EQ (silver), cue (yellow), effects/reverb (blue) and pan (silver).  On the right are the master controls, including twin 10-band graphic equalizers, volume, reverb and effects.

 

The SP600 (left) was a 6-channel powered stereo mixer, which produced 75W into each channel.  The control layout and functionality was the same as the non-powered S1200 & S1800.  Direct price on the SP600 was $595.

The MP1000 mixer (right) was a 250W, 10-channel mixer similar to the S1200, but in a monaural configuration.  The control layout and other features were also the same as the larger stereo models.  The direct price on the MP1000 was $750.  It was also offered in a non-powered version, the MC1000, for $595.00.

Like the MP1000, the MP600 was a  6 channel version of the MP1000, with 150W output and a 7-band graphic EQ.  It sold for $475.  The non-powered MC600 sold for $350.00.

The MP410 was Carvin's basic portable mixer in 1979.  It had similar features as the MP600 - a 7-band graphic EQ, mono configuration, but with only 4 channels and 125W output.  It sold for $350, and was not offered in a non-powered configuration. 

The ASG600 (left) was Carvin's primary power amp in 1979.  It was a stereo amp, which produced a maximum of 300W per channel.  It could be rack-mounted, and came standard in a black tolex case.  A walnut case (as shown) could be ordered for an additional $35.  The direct price of the ASG600 was $495.  Note the subtle cosmetic changes between this model and the 1977 model.

The SV125 and SV250 power amps were 125W and 250W amps designed primarily for use with monitor systems.  The SV125 sold for $220 and the SV250 sold for $290.

In addition to mixers and amps, Carvin offered several speaker and monitor systems in 1979.

  On the left is the PS950 speaker cabinet, which was loaded with a 15" Magnalab speaker, Heppner 44 die-cast horn and Motorola piezo tweeter.  The PS950 sold for $230, and was also offered as the JBL950, with a 15" JBL speaker, for $330.

Above right is the 1330 speaker cabinet, which could be ordered with a 15" Gauss speaker, or a 15" JBL speaker.  The Gauss version was $360, and the JBL version was $295.

On the left is the 770 monitor, which was offered with a 100W 15" Magnalab for $170, or a 100W 15" JBL for $270.

Carvin also offered the PH220 Compression Horn Assembly, which had a pair of Heppner 44 die-cast horns and a pair of Motorola piezo tweeters.  The unit was capable of handling 50W continuous power, and sold for $160.

 

System 1 had an MP410 mixer, 2 M770 speakers, and 2 50' speaker cords.  Price on this system was $695.

System 2 was the same as System 1, but included the SP600 powered mixer versus the MP410.  It sold for $975.

System 3 included an MP600, 2 PS950 speakers, and 2 50' speaker cords.  Price on this system was $950. System 4 had the SP600 stereo powered mixer, 2 PS950 speakers and 2 50' speaker cords.  It sold for $1075.
System 5 came with an MP1000, 2 PS950 speakers, and 2 50' speaker cords.  Price on this system was $1250. System 6 included the MP1000 mixer, 2 Emilar EM250 radial horns, 2 JBL1330 speakers, 2 XC-805 crossovers and speaker and XLR cables.  It sold for $1995.
System 7 included an S1200 stereo mixer, ASG250 250W power amp, 2 PS940 speakers and cables.  Price on this system was $1795. System 8 included the S1200 mixer, ASG600 power amp, 2 Emilar EM250 radial horns, 2 JBL1330 speakers, 2 XC-805 crossovers and speaker and XLR cables.  It sold for $2750.

System 9 was sold in three configurations - basic, concert and super.  All 3 used the Q1608 mixer; the difference was the number of power amps and speakers on each.  Click the picture to see the complete description and components.

System 10 was also sold in three configurations - basic, concert and super.  All 3 used the Q1608 mixer with the MX-16 expander; the difference was the number of power amps and speakers on each.  Click the picture to see the complete description and components.